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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 165

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

To [Christian Friends].

METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE,

NEWINGTON, S.E.

Sept. 1, 1888. My dear friends, Messrs. Fullerton and Smith, have traversed the British islands preaching the word. God has greatly blessed them, and many wandering sheep have been gathered into the fold. They do not work for any party, but for the Lord Jesus. I would beg the Lord’s people of every church to work with them, in inducing the careless to come and hear them, and in looking after any who may be aroused by their testimony. Prayer is asked from all believers. Oh, that these two brethren, by whom the Lord has already wrought so graciously, may be a still greater blessing to every place where they shall in future visit!

C. H. SPURGEON.

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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 164

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

GRAND HOTEL, Thursday.

DEAR MR. FULLERTON, —

I am greatly rejoiced to hear of your success at Abbey Road and I pray that you may have the like blessing at the Tabernacle. If all our friends should be moved by the Spirit of our God to long for a blessing, a blessing will come. Where the masses are all around us there should be no lack of hearers, and there can be none if our people become living advertisements. Then you will need that all should rally to the standard, not only the usual workers, but those who have hitherto been in the rear rank. Should the older members feel it to be their duty to join with the younger in the common effort you would have weight as well as force. I believe that the absence of a single individual is a loss, and that the hearty cooperation of all would ensure an unexampled measure of spiritual power.

As far as in me lies, I would beg the Lord to prosper you at the Tabernacle, and I would also beg my dear people to be earnest in securing the largest measure of blessing.

May you and Mr. Smith feel quite at home. Do at Newington as you have done elsewhere. Your experience will have taught you the best methods, and I desire that you be not swayed by anyone on the spot, but follow the guidance of the Lord’s Spirit and your own judgments.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 163

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, June 14, 1887.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I am sure you need a holiday — all of you. Rest as hard as you can. We don’t want to bury you yet, and working through the summer would end in some such calamity.

May St. Albans have the richest of blessings through your visit, and so cheer you all that you can rest heartily, being washed up by a wave of blessing. Excuse the brevity of my words. The sense is deep — of gratitude to God for all His work done by you, of loving esteem for you, and of desire for your refreshment.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 162

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

MENTONE, 15/1/’84.

DEAR MR. FULLERTON, —

I am in such a position that I must even drive a willing horse beyond reason. I want a paper from you for the Conference.

I have been very ill; I am ill still; can barely sit up. Yet this Conference must be arranged, and I write therefore importunately. Do not deny me. I grant it is too bad, etc. — Grant much more, — I am thoughtless, cruel, tyrannical, mall that is bad.

Still, I beg you to say “Yes.” Some holy spiritual subject. Just handled in your own way.

I groan to see a devout, pleading, spiritual convocation.

You can help towards this as few can. I must be awfully despotic and say you must.

God bless you in Leicester. Best love to Smith and yourself. Oh, that the place may be saved! If any in it love the old truth, may God, our Lord, compel them to come out like men.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 161

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

MENTONE, Dec. 17, [1883].

DEAR FRIEND, —

May the Lord bless your word of yesterday. We did not fail to pray for you. I hope this week will be a happy one for you and for the Tabernacle: may many be decided for the Lord. Here in my rest I am not without opportunities of setting forth Christ, and I hope I shall have a seed for the Lord here also. This rest and reading set me up for the year under the divine blessing.

I am praying that our Weekly Offering this year may not fall short for I am taking more students, and the times need more faithful preachers of the word. I pray that on you and Manton Smith may rest a double portion of the Spirit. Be sure to arrange to be with us next Conference.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

In the Greek emphasis is indicated by the order of words in a sentence

March 17, 2018 6 comments

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Categories: Comment

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 160

TO MESSRS. FULLERTON AND SMITH

WESTWOOD, Sept. 13, 1883.

DEAR BRETHREN, —

I rejoice that you have begun so hopefully in Bury, may you see the Lord’s hand more and more plainly every day. Oh, for thousands of real conversions! We want no sham penitents, and noisy professors; but men and women whose hearts are sick of sin, and whose minds find real rest in Jesus. This must be the work of the Holy Ghost, and therefore the godly must pray mightily for you. All must begin and end at the throne of grace. You and I know this, and have felt the truth of it; and therefore we put it in the forefront of the battle.

Give my love to the Lord’s servants who are helping you, and bid them ask great things from the great God. Why should we look for so little and reap so little? The God of Pentecost is with us.

Yours in much love,

C. H. SPURGEON.