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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 122

TO REV. A. A. REES

CLAPHAM, April 14.

MY DEAR FRIEND, —

Thanks for check £2 10s. and thanks also for your good word. Oh! For divine keeping evermore, for it is as you say — one turning aside, and a life-long testimony is marred. Yet it shall not be so seeing we abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 121

TO REV. A. A. REES

CLAPHAM, 10/9.

DEAR FRIEND, —

Thanks! It should have been hearts. I am always much obliged for these hints.

Yours with much esteem,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 120

TO REV. A. A. REES

NEWINGTON, S.E., June 26, 1869.

DEAR FRIEND,—

In brief reply.

(1) Is a case of zeal overdoing its work. I don’t see how I can prevent it.

(2) I wish I did know some one with whom to advise a change. O____

would have been a fit man, but he is gone to his rest.

(3) H___ supplied for me once before and was capital. This time, probably his last, he was flat, stale and unprofitable I hear — but he is a good fellow and capable of good things. Why did not the Bishop of Sunderland let me know he would be in town, and I should have been, and others too, charmed to have his aid.

Your friend L____ has refused to dismiss to such a wretch as I am, and yet I don’t wear a hatband or shut up the Tabernacle. Dear soul, has he dyspepsia?

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 119

TO REV. A. A. REES

CHAPHAM, Dec. 14, 1867.

MY DEAR MR. REES, —

I congratulate you heartily and hope the tar brush will be laid on heavily, it is our reward from this world, what can it give us better?

I like your Rainbow paper amazingly; you and I will be two equal heretics in prophecy one of these days. I am afraid you will lose caste among the prophets.

1867 is nearly over and Dr. Cumming must feel awkward I should think.

How do things go on at Sunderland? Is the Lord with you? We are well spiritually — poor creatures otherwise.

Yours very truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 118

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

WESTWOOD, Mar. 27, 1889.

DEAR MR. BARROW,—

You are always kind. In many ways you have helped my work like a prince, and I pray the Lord to trust so good a steward with yet larger supplies. I should have been glad of you as a chairman even without your money — useful as that is; but I would not be guilty of overriding a free horse.

May every blessing rest on you and all your household! When the weather is warmer, I will invite myself to your house on the strength of the kind invitation of your letter.

Most sincere thanks for your promise of £25.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 117

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

WESTWOOD, Mar. 23, 1889.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I am in great need of your aid just now. I want you to take the chair at the College Supper, Wednesday, May 8.

You have been such a splendid helper by building chapels that I want to recognize my indebtedness to you for this, and many other kindnesses, by getting still deeper into debt.

My father has told me of your country-house, which I must hope to visit; but. this time I want you to visit me at my workshop. I shall be very greatly relieved and comforted if you will send a speedy “Yea” to this request.

With kindest regards to yourself and Mrs. Barrow,

I am,

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 116

To [Mr. Barrow, Sen.].

MENTONE, Jan. 5, ‘87.

DEAR MR. BARROW, —

I most gratefully acknowledge your check for £30 17S. 9d., for Orphanage. This is only one among many generous acts of yours by which my work has been aided. I have never been able fitly to thank you for your princely deeds, but I pray for you to our Lord, and I say, “Lord, he hath loved our nation, and he hath built us several synagogues.” May the best of blessings rest on you, and Mrs. Barrow, and all the family.

I joyfully remember meeting you here. Our weather is rather broken in imitation of yours at home. I have been very ill, but I am now better and letters like yours help to strengthen a fellow.

Will you please direct the enclosed to Mr. W , whose address I do not know?

Yours ever most heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.