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Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 130

TO REV. T. W. MEDHURST

BOROUGH, July 14, 1854.

DEAR SIR, —

I am glad that you have been able to write to me and state your feelings. Though my hands are always full, it will ever give me joy to receive such notes as yours.

You ask me a very important question, “Are you one of God’s elect?” Now, this is a question neither you nor I can answer at present, and therefore let it drop. I will ask you an easier one, “Are you a sinner?” Can you say “YES”? All say, “YES”; but then they do not know what the word “sinner” means.

A sinner is a creature who has broken all his Maker’s commands, despised His Name, and run into rebellion against the Most High. A sinner deserves hell, yea, the hottest place in hell; and if he be saved, it must be entirely by unmerited mercy. Now, if you are such a sinner, I am glad to be able to tell you the only way of salvation, “Believe on the Lord Jesus.”

I think you have not yet really understood what believing means. You are, I trust, really awakened, but you do not see the door yet. I advise you seriously to be much alone, I mean as much as you can; let your groans go up if you cannot pray, attend as many services as possible; and if you go with an earnest desire for a blessing, it will come very soon. But why not believe now? You have only ‘to believe that Jesus is able and willing to save, and then trust yourself to Him.

Harbor not that dark suggestion to forsake the house of God; remember you turn your back on Heaven, and your face to hell, the moment you do that. I pray God that He will keep you. If the Lord had meant to destroy you, He would not have showed you such things as these. If you are but as smoking flax, there is hope. Touch the hem of His garment; look to the brazen serpent.

My dear fellow-sinner, slight not this season of awakening. Up, and be in earnest. It is your soul, your OWN soul, your eternal welfare, your Heaven or your hell, that is at stake.

There is the cross, and a bleeding God-man upon it; look to Him, and be saved! There is the Holy Spirit able to give you every grace. Look, in prayer, to the Sacred Three-one-God, and then you will be delivered.

I am,

Your anxious friend,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 129

TO REV. A. A. REES

CLAPHAM, July 20.

DEAR FRIEND,-Issue free tickets, making sure that you print no more than the place will honestly hold. Give these away discreetly by yourself and judicious friends, and not by public announcement.

Scarcely a bill need be printed. I will, D.V., preach afternoon and evening.

As to how I come please leave till later. I may perhaps bring my boys for a little trip.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 128

TO REV. A. A. REES

WESTWOOD, Jan 3, 1882.

DEAR FRIEND, —

I am very grateful for your friends’ gift of £5 for orphans. By one and another the charges are borne by the Great Father; glory be to His name.

I have been much pleased by an interview with Mr. Wigstone. May the Lord bless Spain by his means.

May the old midshipman have a prosperous voyage this year.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 127

TO REV. A. A. REES

WESTWOOD, Mar. 22, 1881.

DEAR FRIEND, —

When you speak of 40 years’ ministry you make me look up to you with reverent awe. Surely you must be getting old. Blessed be the Lord who has upheld you in honor and in strength. I joy and rejoice in His name as I think of His faithfulness to you.

I have had rough sailing of late. This place, above the fogs, is perhaps worse in extreme winter for my disease, by reason of increased cold; but in ordinary times it must be much better; besides I can breathe here and do not feel like being inside a saucepan with the lid on. I feel sure the position with God’s blessing will be a permanent boon to me.

Many thanks for £5 from your thanksgiving. The Lord is with us graciously in this work.

Peace be to you, and all the blessings of the covenant.

Yours ever most heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 126

TO REV. A. A. REES

WESTWOOD, May 17, 1880.

DEAR FRIEND,—

You shall have the Treasury as a present from me, and I shall count it only a very small token of my love to you. I think you will find good store in it of others’ thoughts, and mine may make the parsley on the dish.

May our Lord ever bless you.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 125

TO REV. A. A. REES

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Jan. 17, [1877].

DEAR FRIEND, —

I think that at the time I spoke the rebuke was deserved, but I never meant to impute neglect of the poor to the voluntary principle, but rather to the form of government which produces the isolation of the churches, and their absolute independency. The Presbyterian and Wesleyan form of polity axe well adapted to reach the poorest localities and we can give abundant evidences to show that in Scotland by the Free Church and United Presbyterians the power of voluntary aid among the poor is abundantly illustrated, and in England all along by the Primitive Methodists.

Please to note that since 1861 which is 15 or 16 years ago there have been remarkable changes, — churches have been removed from London into the suburbs, and on the other hand many noble missions of a purely voluntary character have arisen and have been successfully worked, as I hoped they would be when I spoke so severely.

If your antagonist has no better argument than this very stale one, his cause is nigh unto death.

Yours heartily,

C. H. SPURGEON.

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 124

TO REV. A. A. REES

NIGHTINGALE LANE, May 7’

DEAR FRIEND, —

I wrote to Mr. N___ I am, like yourself, more and more grieved to see the worldliness of professors. I have sharp work with it in the church.

I have invited Messrs. M. & S. to the Tabernacle, but they say that if my preaching does not suffice neither will men be converted though one rose from the dead. They axe as humble as they are useful. I rejoice in them greatly. May you succeed in getting them to Sunderland.

I wish I could read all your note, but I cannot and therefore if I do not answer pray excuse me. I spell and spell but you axe such an awful aristocrat that I cannot make out your hieroglyphics.

Anyhow I love you.

Yours truly,

C. H. SPURGEON.