You are free to all that is in the Bible

And now, dear friends, I have shown you as briefly as I can the negative side of this liberty. I have tried to tell you, as well as I could put it in a few words, what we are freed from. But there are two sides to such questions as this. There are some glorious things that we are free to. Not only are we freed from sin in every sense from the law, and from the fear of death; but we are free to do something. I shall not occupy many moments, but shall just run over a few things we are free to; for, my brother Christians, “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty;” and that liberty gives us certain rights and privileges.

In the first place, we are free to heaven’s charter. There is heaven’s charter-the Magna Charta-the Bible; and, my brother, you are free to it. There is a choice passage here: “When thou passest through the river I will be with thee, and the floods shall not overflow thee;” thou art free to that. Here is another: “Mountains may depart, and hills may be removed; but my lovingkindness shall not depart:” you are free to that. Here is another “Having loved his own, he loved them unto the end.” You are free to that. “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.” Here is a chapter touching election: you are free to that if you are elect. Here is another, speaking of the non-condemnation of the righteous, and their justification; you are free to that. You are free to all that is in the Bible. Here is a never failing treasure filled with boundless stores of grace. It is the bank of heaven: you may draw from it as much as you please without let or hindrance. Bring nothing with you, except faith. Bring as much faith as you can get, and you are welcome to all that is in the Bible. There is not a promise, not a word in it, that is not yours. In the depths of tribulation let it comfort you. Mid waves of distress let it cheer you. When sorrows surround thee, let it be thy helper. This is thy father’s love-token: let it never be shut up and covered with dust. Thou art free to it-use, then, thy freedom.

Charles H. Spurgeon- Spiritual Liberty, A Sermon Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 18, 1855

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The Covenants-Chapter 8e- The Old Covenant and the New Covenant

We now for a moment, in conclusion, consider the exalted design, and nature of this new covenant— the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ.

These are presented in a single sentence, by the Saviour himself:—”God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” And Paul said to the Corinthian; “I declare unto you the gospel, which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand, by which also ye are saved;” “how that Christ died for our sins, according to the scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day, according to the scriptures.” To Timothy he said, “this is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners.” “We preach,” said he, in another place, “Christ crucified; to the Jews a stumbling block, and to the Greeks foolishness; but to them that are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God.” But still more fully and explicitly; “The love of Christ constraineth us, because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead; and that he died for all, that they who live, should not, henceforth, live unto themselves, but unto him who died for them, and rose again.” “Therefore, if any man be in Christ Jesus, he is a new creature. Old things have passed away; behold all things have become new. And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us unto himself by Jesus Christ.” “For God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them;” and “hath made him, who knew no sin, to be sin for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” In these, and like inspired expositions, we have a true representation of the gospel covenant. It teaches us that we are depraved, and sinful, and that while we remain in this condition, we must continue under the wrath of God, and thus wholly disqualified for happiness, and heaven; it teaches us that the mercy of God, originating exclusively in himself, could reach the estate of guilty and lost men, only through the great sacrifice of his Son, our adorable Redeemer, who came into our world, fulfilled in our behalf all the claims of divine justice, and through his own mediation offers us salvation, and eternal life; it teaches us that “with this sacrifice God is well pleased,” and can through him, consistently pardon the sinner, and does pardon all, however guilty, who believe in his Son our Saviour; and it teaches us that he sends into the heart of every true penitent, the Holy Spirit, by whose ministry he is regenerated, sanctified, and prepared to be an eternal inhabitant of the kingdom of glory.

R. B. C. Howell- The Covenants

Charles Spurgeon’s Letters-Letter 230

GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE

WESTWOOD.

DEAR FRIEND, —

If we are to rejoice with them that do rejoice, I am bound to shout with the boys and girls at Stockwell who are made happy by your bounty. You have helped to make a merry Christmas for them. May the Lord give you a full return in your own household and person!

May the blessing of the Father of the fatherless come into your soul like music from angelic harps.

Your kind gift…. was safely received.

Yours with all the good wishes of the season,

C. H. SPURGEON

The Wednesday Word: I Confess

I confess

That I am a great sinner, but Jesus is an even greater Saviour. (Ephesians 2: 8-9).

I confess

That I need a Saviour and that Jesus is the Saviour I need (2 Timothy 1:10).

I confess

I am guilty, prone to wander but, by the Gospel, I am justified freely by His grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus (Romans 3:24).

I confess

I had ruined myself by sin, and, apart from grace, I would stand exposed to divine retribution. But I rejoice in the Gospel because by the Gospel I continually learn that Jesus was made (reckoned) sin for me, that I might be made (reckoned) the righteousness of God in Him (2 Corinthians 5:21).

I confess

I am now a child of God.

Because of the Gospel, I am made alive, adopted, justified, accepted, and clothed in righteousness. ” God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6: 14).

I confess

I have been raised from spiritual death. Spiritually speaking, my filthy garments of sin are taken off and new robes of righteousness, white, clean and beautiful, put on (Zechariah 3:3-4, Isaiah 61:10).

I confess

Now that I am saved, I will “Set my affection on things above where Christ is” (Colossians 3: 2). He is precious. I will purpose to enjoy Him today and every day.

I confess

That Jesus is with me 24 hours per day for He said, “I am with you always, even unto the end of the world” (Matthew 28: 3). Even when I neglect to seek Him, even when I don´t think of Him, He is with me. He is the Master of all grace. I am continually with Him. I cannot be where He is not. There is no separation (Romans 8:38-39).

I confess

That I am, “Kept by the power of God” (1 Peter 1: 5).

I cannot keep myself. The pull of the world the flesh and the devil are too strong for me. But I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. “I will not be afraid of tens of thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about” (Psalm 3:6). “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” (Psalm 27: 1). He will keep me unto salvation.

I confess

The Lord has promised that “In the secret of His tabernacle shall He hide me” (Psalm 27: 5). In the time of danger, He will hide me in His dwelling place and defend me. He will situate me in a place inaccessible to my enemies.

I confess

That God Himself is with me as my Captain (2 Chronicles 13:12). As you lead me Oh Lord, I acknowledge that you are in charge.

I confess

I have a High Priest who can be touched with the feeling of my infirmities (Hebrews 4:15). Lord Jesus, you know about my sickness and sorrow. You stand in my shoes. You understand the struggles that come as a part of this wretched human condition.

I confess

That “In Thee Lord do I put my trust” (Psalm 16:1).

I have no one else to trust. Whom can I trust with my eternal destiny but you? You have promised eternal life to your sheep. You have died in my place and risen from the grave. I put my trust in you.

I confess

That you are coming back for me (John 14:3). There is a soon coming day that is called the Day of the Lord. My hope is centered in You Lord Jesus, the God-man. Thy Kingdom Come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven.

And that´s the Gospel Truth!

Miles Mckee

www.milesmckee.com  

The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination Chapter XVI- That it is inconsistent with the Free Agency and Moral Responsibility of Man

The Reformed Doctrine Of Predestination

Chapter XVI

That It Is Inconsistent With the Free Agency
And Moral Responsibility of Man

4. MAN’S NATURAL WILL IS ENSLAVED TO EVIL

Strictly speaking we may say man has free will only in the sense that he is not under any outside compulsion which interferes with his freedom of choice or his just accountability. In his fallen state he only has what we may call “the freedom of slavery.” He is in bondage to sin and spontaneously follows Satan. He does not have the ability or incentive to follow God. Now, we ask, is this a thing worthy the name “free”? and the answer is, No. Not freewill but self-will would more appropriately describe man’s condition since the fall. It is to be remembered that man was not created a captive to sin but that he has come into that condition by his own fault; and a loss which he has brought upon himself does not free him from responsibility. After man’s redemption is complete he will spontaneously follow God, as do the holy angels; but never will he become entirely his own master.

That this was Luther’s doctrine cannot be denied. In his book, “The Bondage of the Will,” the main purpose of which was to prove that the will of man is by nature enslaved to evil only, and that because it is fond of that slavery it is said to be free, he declared: “Whatever man does, he does necessarily, though not with any sensible compulsion, and he can only do what God from eternity willed and foreknew he should, which will of God must be effectual and His foresight must be certain . .. Neither the Divine nor human will does anything by constraint, and whatever man does, be it good or bad, he does with as much appetite and willingness as if his will was really free. But, after all, the will of God is certain and unalterable, and it is the governess of ours.” 1 In another place he says, “When it is granted and established, that Free-will, having once lost its liberty, is compulsively bound to the service of sin, and cannot will anything good; I from these words, can understand nothing else than that Free-will is an empty term, whose reality is lost. And a lost liberty, according to my grammar, is no liberty at all.” 2 He refers to Free-will as “a mere lie,” 3 and later adds, “This, therefore, is also essentially necessary and wholesome for Christians to know: that God foreknows nothing by contingency, but that He foresees, purposes and does all things according to his immutable, eternal, and infallible will. By this thunderbolt, Free-will is thrown prostrate, utterly dashed to pieces …. It follows unalterably, that all things which we do, although they may appear to us to be done mutably and contingently, and even may be done thus contingently by us, are yet, in reality, done necessarily and immutably, with respect to the will of God. For the will of God is effective and cannot be hindered; because the very power of God is natural to Him, and His wisdom is such that He cannot be deceived.” 4

It is some times objected that unless man’s will is completely free, God commands him to do what he cannot do. In numerous places in Scripture, however, men are commended to do things which in their own strength they are utterly unable to do. The man with the withered hand was commanded to stretch it forth. The paralytic was commanded to arise and walk; the sick man to arise, take up his bed and walk. The dead Lazarus was commanded to come forth. Men are commanded to believe; yet faith is said to be the “gift of God.” “Awake, thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall shine upon thee,” Ephesians 6:14. “Ye therefore shall be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect,” Matthew 5:48. Man’s self-imposed inability in the moral sphere does not free him from obligation.

Loraine Boettner- The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination

The everlasting covenant or covenant of grace is that mutual agreement into which the Father entered with His Son

The everlasting covenant or covenant of grace is that mutual agreement into which the Father entered with His Son before the foundation of the world respecting the salvation of His elect, Christ being appointed the mediator, He willingly consenting to be their head and representative. That there is a divine covenant to which Christ stands related, and that the great work which He performed here on earth was the discharge of His covenant office, is very plain from many Scriptures, first of all, from the covenant titles which He bears. In Isaiah 42:6 we hear the Father saying to the Son: “I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold throe hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles.” As a covenantee in it, Christ is thus “given” unto His people, as the pledge of all its blessings (cf. Rom. 8:32). He is the representative of His people in it. He is, in His n person and work, the sum and substance of it. He has fulfilled all its terms, and now dispenses its rewards.

Arthur W. Pink- The Divine Covenants-Part One-The Everlasting Covenant

Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty” from the Fear of Death

6. But to conclude, “where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty” from the Fear of Death. O death! how many a sweet cup hast thou made bitter. O death! how many a revel hast thou broken up. O death! how many a gluttonous banquet hast thou spoiled. O death! how many a sinful pleasure hast thou turned into pain. Take ye, my friends, the telescope this morning, and look through the vista of a few years, and what see you? Grim death in the distance grasping his scythe. He is coming, coming, coming; and what is behind him? Ay, that depends upon your own character. If ye are the sons of God, there is the palm-branch; if ye are not, ye know what followeth death-Hell follows him. O death! thy specter hath haunted many a house where sin otherwise would have rioted O death! thy chilly hand hath touched many a heart that was big with lust, and made it start affrighted from its crime. Oh! how many men are slaves to the fear of death. Half the people in the world are afraid to die. There are some madmen who can march up to the cannon’s mouth, there are some fools who rush with bloody hands before their Maker’s tribunal; but most men fear to die. Who is the man that does not fear to die? I will tell you. The man that is a believer. Fear to die! Thank God, I do not. The cholera may come again next summer-I pray God it may not, but if it does, it matters not to me: I will toil and visit the sick by night and by day, until I drop, and if it takes me, sudden death is sudden glory. And so-with the weakest saint in this hall; the prospect of dissolution does not make you tremble. Sometimes you fear, but oftener you rejoice. You sit down calmly and think of dying. What is death? It is a low porch through which you stoop to enter heaven. What is life? It is a narrow screen that separates us from glory, and death kindly removes it. I recollect a saying of a good old woman, who said, “Afraid to die, sir! I have dipped my foot in Jordan every morning before breakfast for the last fifty years, and do you think I am afraid to die now?” Die! beloved: why we die hundreds of times, we “die daily,” we die every morning, we die each night when we sleep, by faith we die, and so dying will be old work when we come to it. We shall say, “Ah, death! you and I have been old acquaintances; I have had thee in my bedroom every night. I have talked with thee each day; I have had the skull upon my dressing table, and I have ofttimes thought of thee. Death! thou art come at last, but thou art a welcome guest- thou art an angel of light, and the best friend I have had “Why, then, dread death since there is no fear of God’s leaving you when you come to die! Here I must tell you that anecdote of the good Welch lady, who, when she lay a-dying, was visited by her minister. He said to her, “Sister are you sinking?” She answered him not a word, but looked at him with an incredulous eye. He repeated the question, “Sister, are you sinking?” She looked at him again, as if she could not believe that he would ask such a question. At last, rising a little in the bed, she said, “Sinking! Sinking! Did you ever know a sinner sink through a rock? If I had been standing on the sand, I might sink; but, thank God I am on the Rock of Ages, and there is no sinking there.” How glorious to diet Oh, angels, come! Oh, cohorts of the Lord of hosts, stretch, stretch your broad wings and lift us up from earth; O, winged seraphs, bear us far above the reach of these inferior things; but till ye come, I’ll sing,

Since Jesus is mine, I’ll not fear undressing-

But gladly put off these garments of clay,

To die in the lord is a covenant blessing;

Since Jesus to glory, though death lead the way.”

Charles H. Spurgeon- Spiritual Liberty, A Sermon Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 18, 1855